Skateboard Deck Art for SkaterAid Auction
An ode to printed books and public libraries, my contribution to the SkaterAid deck art auction pays homage to the book that inspired my passion for reading and the writer who sparked my desire to become a poet. In a literary mashup of sorts, Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird”—the first book I recall reading as a young boy—meets “Mockingbird Wish Me Luck” by Charles Bukowski, whose work awoke the poet within this former journalist. This piece, titled “Mockingbird,” features a meaningful quote from both books, each of which underscores why these literary greats played a important role in my evolution. The backdrop of a library book checkout card honors the place that nurtured and nourished my love for literature. 
Check out my SkaterAid deck art—and the amazing work of more than 100 other contributing artists—in person at the exhibition’s opening reception at Brick Store Pub in Decatur, Ga., from noon to 5 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 24. The decks will be on view through September. The online auction ends at 5 p.m., Friday, Sept. 26. Bidding will resume at the SkaterAid event on Sunday, Sept. 28. As noted on the SkaterAid website, you must attend the event or send a trusted friend to bid for you in order to maintain your status as high bidder.
All proceeds from SkaterAid, now in its 10th and final year, go to the Brain Tumor Foundation for Children.
ZoomInfo
Skateboard Deck Art for SkaterAid Auction
An ode to printed books and public libraries, my contribution to the SkaterAid deck art auction pays homage to the book that inspired my passion for reading and the writer who sparked my desire to become a poet. In a literary mashup of sorts, Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird”—the first book I recall reading as a young boy—meets “Mockingbird Wish Me Luck” by Charles Bukowski, whose work awoke the poet within this former journalist. This piece, titled “Mockingbird,” features a meaningful quote from both books, each of which underscores why these literary greats played a important role in my evolution. The backdrop of a library book checkout card honors the place that nurtured and nourished my love for literature. 
Check out my SkaterAid deck art—and the amazing work of more than 100 other contributing artists—in person at the exhibition’s opening reception at Brick Store Pub in Decatur, Ga., from noon to 5 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 24. The decks will be on view through September. The online auction ends at 5 p.m., Friday, Sept. 26. Bidding will resume at the SkaterAid event on Sunday, Sept. 28. As noted on the SkaterAid website, you must attend the event or send a trusted friend to bid for you in order to maintain your status as high bidder.
All proceeds from SkaterAid, now in its 10th and final year, go to the Brain Tumor Foundation for Children.
ZoomInfo
Skateboard Deck Art for SkaterAid Auction
An ode to printed books and public libraries, my contribution to the SkaterAid deck art auction pays homage to the book that inspired my passion for reading and the writer who sparked my desire to become a poet. In a literary mashup of sorts, Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird”—the first book I recall reading as a young boy—meets “Mockingbird Wish Me Luck” by Charles Bukowski, whose work awoke the poet within this former journalist. This piece, titled “Mockingbird,” features a meaningful quote from both books, each of which underscores why these literary greats played a important role in my evolution. The backdrop of a library book checkout card honors the place that nurtured and nourished my love for literature. 
Check out my SkaterAid deck art—and the amazing work of more than 100 other contributing artists—in person at the exhibition’s opening reception at Brick Store Pub in Decatur, Ga., from noon to 5 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 24. The decks will be on view through September. The online auction ends at 5 p.m., Friday, Sept. 26. Bidding will resume at the SkaterAid event on Sunday, Sept. 28. As noted on the SkaterAid website, you must attend the event or send a trusted friend to bid for you in order to maintain your status as high bidder.
All proceeds from SkaterAid, now in its 10th and final year, go to the Brain Tumor Foundation for Children.
ZoomInfo
Skateboard Deck Art for SkaterAid Auction
An ode to printed books and public libraries, my contribution to the SkaterAid deck art auction pays homage to the book that inspired my passion for reading and the writer who sparked my desire to become a poet. In a literary mashup of sorts, Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird”—the first book I recall reading as a young boy—meets “Mockingbird Wish Me Luck” by Charles Bukowski, whose work awoke the poet within this former journalist. This piece, titled “Mockingbird,” features a meaningful quote from both books, each of which underscores why these literary greats played a important role in my evolution. The backdrop of a library book checkout card honors the place that nurtured and nourished my love for literature. 
Check out my SkaterAid deck art—and the amazing work of more than 100 other contributing artists—in person at the exhibition’s opening reception at Brick Store Pub in Decatur, Ga., from noon to 5 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 24. The decks will be on view through September. The online auction ends at 5 p.m., Friday, Sept. 26. Bidding will resume at the SkaterAid event on Sunday, Sept. 28. As noted on the SkaterAid website, you must attend the event or send a trusted friend to bid for you in order to maintain your status as high bidder.
All proceeds from SkaterAid, now in its 10th and final year, go to the Brain Tumor Foundation for Children.
ZoomInfo

Skateboard Deck Art for SkaterAid Auction

An ode to printed books and public libraries, my contribution to the SkaterAid deck art auction pays homage to the book that inspired my passion for reading and the writer who sparked my desire to become a poet. In a literary mashup of sorts, Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird”—the first book I recall reading as a young boy—meets “Mockingbird Wish Me Luck” by Charles Bukowski, whose work awoke the poet within this former journalist. This piece, titled “Mockingbird,” features a meaningful quote from both books, each of which underscores why these literary greats played a important role in my evolution. The backdrop of a library book checkout card honors the place that nurtured and nourished my love for literature. 

Check out my SkaterAid deck art—and the amazing work of more than 100 other contributing artists—in person at the exhibition’s opening reception at Brick Store Pub in Decatur, Ga., from noon to 5 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 24. The decks will be on view through September. The online auction ends at 5 p.m., Friday, Sept. 26. Bidding will resume at the SkaterAid event on Sunday, Sept. 28. As noted on the SkaterAid website, you must attend the event or send a trusted friend to bid for you in order to maintain your status as high bidder.

All proceeds from SkaterAid, now in its 10th and final year, go to the Brain Tumor Foundation for Children.

Hundertwasser’s Quixote
In August 2013, I had the pleasure of visiting a wholly distinct structure and place all its own. Painted against the backdrop of the Stags Leap Palisades in Napa Valley, Quixote Winery produces some tasty Petite Sirah. Carl Doumani, who created Quixote in 1997 after he sold the venerable Stags’ Leap Winery, was selling. Retiring, really.
An L.A. film crew was on site to shoot a promotional video of the property—the winery and adjacent home just up the hill. I, by luck and marriage, was there. Free to roam the estate for the better part of two days, I roamed. Then came the tasting. Not a few sips and spits. Bottles were opened. Bottles were drank. OK, call it a drinking. This all occurred on the petite winery’s patio, where an eclectic group of people had gathered. Marketing, PR and communications professionals by day; a street poet, folk art painter, East Coast rapper, Australian actress, and a few other Bohemians by night (or, in this case, by end of first bottle). Chatting with Doumani—about his stories as a vintner and about collaborating with an eccentric Austrian artist and architect to design the joint—only added to the surreal nature of the experience. 
Doumani and Friedensreich Hundertwasser, who worked for a decade to build the winery, paired together quite nicely—both unruly iconoclasts who relished poking the establishment. Doumani recalled the artist skinny dipping in the property’s pond and taking an ill-advised hike up the rocky mountainside in clogs with a couple of lady friends (he soon returned looking to borrow boots). Beyond the mischief, these characters connected for a noble pursuit. And the location and setting facilitated both of their visions. For Doumani, he surely got a kick out of constructing a Seussian structure in the heart of Napa Valley. For Hundertwasser, the landscape certainly invigorated his theme of organic forms in harmony with nature. The result of the project—Hundertwasser’s only building in the U.S.—is at once striking and serene. Golden dome, brightly colored (and cracked) tiles, warped floors, curved walls, and perfect imperfections infuse the air with magic and wonder. 
Doumani sold Quixote this week. For the sake of humanity, I pray the new owners honor the spirit (and spirits) of this Elysium, where gorgeous grapes are transformed into delicious nectar, where staid architecture surrenders to enchanting art.
"The straight line is a man-made danger. There are so many lines, but only one of them is deadly and that is the straight line drawn with a ruler. The straight line is completely alien to mankind, to life, to all creation."— Friedensreich Hundertwasser
ZoomInfo
Hundertwasser’s Quixote
In August 2013, I had the pleasure of visiting a wholly distinct structure and place all its own. Painted against the backdrop of the Stags Leap Palisades in Napa Valley, Quixote Winery produces some tasty Petite Sirah. Carl Doumani, who created Quixote in 1997 after he sold the venerable Stags’ Leap Winery, was selling. Retiring, really.
An L.A. film crew was on site to shoot a promotional video of the property—the winery and adjacent home just up the hill. I, by luck and marriage, was there. Free to roam the estate for the better part of two days, I roamed. Then came the tasting. Not a few sips and spits. Bottles were opened. Bottles were drank. OK, call it a drinking. This all occurred on the petite winery’s patio, where an eclectic group of people had gathered. Marketing, PR and communications professionals by day; a street poet, folk art painter, East Coast rapper, Australian actress, and a few other Bohemians by night (or, in this case, by end of first bottle). Chatting with Doumani—about his stories as a vintner and about collaborating with an eccentric Austrian artist and architect to design the joint—only added to the surreal nature of the experience. 
Doumani and Friedensreich Hundertwasser, who worked for a decade to build the winery, paired together quite nicely—both unruly iconoclasts who relished poking the establishment. Doumani recalled the artist skinny dipping in the property’s pond and taking an ill-advised hike up the rocky mountainside in clogs with a couple of lady friends (he soon returned looking to borrow boots). Beyond the mischief, these characters connected for a noble pursuit. And the location and setting facilitated both of their visions. For Doumani, he surely got a kick out of constructing a Seussian structure in the heart of Napa Valley. For Hundertwasser, the landscape certainly invigorated his theme of organic forms in harmony with nature. The result of the project—Hundertwasser’s only building in the U.S.—is at once striking and serene. Golden dome, brightly colored (and cracked) tiles, warped floors, curved walls, and perfect imperfections infuse the air with magic and wonder. 
Doumani sold Quixote this week. For the sake of humanity, I pray the new owners honor the spirit (and spirits) of this Elysium, where gorgeous grapes are transformed into delicious nectar, where staid architecture surrenders to enchanting art.
"The straight line is a man-made danger. There are so many lines, but only one of them is deadly and that is the straight line drawn with a ruler. The straight line is completely alien to mankind, to life, to all creation."— Friedensreich Hundertwasser
ZoomInfo
Hundertwasser’s Quixote
In August 2013, I had the pleasure of visiting a wholly distinct structure and place all its own. Painted against the backdrop of the Stags Leap Palisades in Napa Valley, Quixote Winery produces some tasty Petite Sirah. Carl Doumani, who created Quixote in 1997 after he sold the venerable Stags’ Leap Winery, was selling. Retiring, really.
An L.A. film crew was on site to shoot a promotional video of the property—the winery and adjacent home just up the hill. I, by luck and marriage, was there. Free to roam the estate for the better part of two days, I roamed. Then came the tasting. Not a few sips and spits. Bottles were opened. Bottles were drank. OK, call it a drinking. This all occurred on the petite winery’s patio, where an eclectic group of people had gathered. Marketing, PR and communications professionals by day; a street poet, folk art painter, East Coast rapper, Australian actress, and a few other Bohemians by night (or, in this case, by end of first bottle). Chatting with Doumani—about his stories as a vintner and about collaborating with an eccentric Austrian artist and architect to design the joint—only added to the surreal nature of the experience. 
Doumani and Friedensreich Hundertwasser, who worked for a decade to build the winery, paired together quite nicely—both unruly iconoclasts who relished poking the establishment. Doumani recalled the artist skinny dipping in the property’s pond and taking an ill-advised hike up the rocky mountainside in clogs with a couple of lady friends (he soon returned looking to borrow boots). Beyond the mischief, these characters connected for a noble pursuit. And the location and setting facilitated both of their visions. For Doumani, he surely got a kick out of constructing a Seussian structure in the heart of Napa Valley. For Hundertwasser, the landscape certainly invigorated his theme of organic forms in harmony with nature. The result of the project—Hundertwasser’s only building in the U.S.—is at once striking and serene. Golden dome, brightly colored (and cracked) tiles, warped floors, curved walls, and perfect imperfections infuse the air with magic and wonder. 
Doumani sold Quixote this week. For the sake of humanity, I pray the new owners honor the spirit (and spirits) of this Elysium, where gorgeous grapes are transformed into delicious nectar, where staid architecture surrenders to enchanting art.
"The straight line is a man-made danger. There are so many lines, but only one of them is deadly and that is the straight line drawn with a ruler. The straight line is completely alien to mankind, to life, to all creation."— Friedensreich Hundertwasser
ZoomInfo
Hundertwasser’s Quixote
In August 2013, I had the pleasure of visiting a wholly distinct structure and place all its own. Painted against the backdrop of the Stags Leap Palisades in Napa Valley, Quixote Winery produces some tasty Petite Sirah. Carl Doumani, who created Quixote in 1997 after he sold the venerable Stags’ Leap Winery, was selling. Retiring, really.
An L.A. film crew was on site to shoot a promotional video of the property—the winery and adjacent home just up the hill. I, by luck and marriage, was there. Free to roam the estate for the better part of two days, I roamed. Then came the tasting. Not a few sips and spits. Bottles were opened. Bottles were drank. OK, call it a drinking. This all occurred on the petite winery’s patio, where an eclectic group of people had gathered. Marketing, PR and communications professionals by day; a street poet, folk art painter, East Coast rapper, Australian actress, and a few other Bohemians by night (or, in this case, by end of first bottle). Chatting with Doumani—about his stories as a vintner and about collaborating with an eccentric Austrian artist and architect to design the joint—only added to the surreal nature of the experience. 
Doumani and Friedensreich Hundertwasser, who worked for a decade to build the winery, paired together quite nicely—both unruly iconoclasts who relished poking the establishment. Doumani recalled the artist skinny dipping in the property’s pond and taking an ill-advised hike up the rocky mountainside in clogs with a couple of lady friends (he soon returned looking to borrow boots). Beyond the mischief, these characters connected for a noble pursuit. And the location and setting facilitated both of their visions. For Doumani, he surely got a kick out of constructing a Seussian structure in the heart of Napa Valley. For Hundertwasser, the landscape certainly invigorated his theme of organic forms in harmony with nature. The result of the project—Hundertwasser’s only building in the U.S.—is at once striking and serene. Golden dome, brightly colored (and cracked) tiles, warped floors, curved walls, and perfect imperfections infuse the air with magic and wonder. 
Doumani sold Quixote this week. For the sake of humanity, I pray the new owners honor the spirit (and spirits) of this Elysium, where gorgeous grapes are transformed into delicious nectar, where staid architecture surrenders to enchanting art.
"The straight line is a man-made danger. There are so many lines, but only one of them is deadly and that is the straight line drawn with a ruler. The straight line is completely alien to mankind, to life, to all creation."— Friedensreich Hundertwasser
ZoomInfo
Hundertwasser’s Quixote
In August 2013, I had the pleasure of visiting a wholly distinct structure and place all its own. Painted against the backdrop of the Stags Leap Palisades in Napa Valley, Quixote Winery produces some tasty Petite Sirah. Carl Doumani, who created Quixote in 1997 after he sold the venerable Stags’ Leap Winery, was selling. Retiring, really.
An L.A. film crew was on site to shoot a promotional video of the property—the winery and adjacent home just up the hill. I, by luck and marriage, was there. Free to roam the estate for the better part of two days, I roamed. Then came the tasting. Not a few sips and spits. Bottles were opened. Bottles were drank. OK, call it a drinking. This all occurred on the petite winery’s patio, where an eclectic group of people had gathered. Marketing, PR and communications professionals by day; a street poet, folk art painter, East Coast rapper, Australian actress, and a few other Bohemians by night (or, in this case, by end of first bottle). Chatting with Doumani—about his stories as a vintner and about collaborating with an eccentric Austrian artist and architect to design the joint—only added to the surreal nature of the experience. 
Doumani and Friedensreich Hundertwasser, who worked for a decade to build the winery, paired together quite nicely—both unruly iconoclasts who relished poking the establishment. Doumani recalled the artist skinny dipping in the property’s pond and taking an ill-advised hike up the rocky mountainside in clogs with a couple of lady friends (he soon returned looking to borrow boots). Beyond the mischief, these characters connected for a noble pursuit. And the location and setting facilitated both of their visions. For Doumani, he surely got a kick out of constructing a Seussian structure in the heart of Napa Valley. For Hundertwasser, the landscape certainly invigorated his theme of organic forms in harmony with nature. The result of the project—Hundertwasser’s only building in the U.S.—is at once striking and serene. Golden dome, brightly colored (and cracked) tiles, warped floors, curved walls, and perfect imperfections infuse the air with magic and wonder. 
Doumani sold Quixote this week. For the sake of humanity, I pray the new owners honor the spirit (and spirits) of this Elysium, where gorgeous grapes are transformed into delicious nectar, where staid architecture surrenders to enchanting art.
"The straight line is a man-made danger. There are so many lines, but only one of them is deadly and that is the straight line drawn with a ruler. The straight line is completely alien to mankind, to life, to all creation."— Friedensreich Hundertwasser
ZoomInfo
Hundertwasser’s Quixote
In August 2013, I had the pleasure of visiting a wholly distinct structure and place all its own. Painted against the backdrop of the Stags Leap Palisades in Napa Valley, Quixote Winery produces some tasty Petite Sirah. Carl Doumani, who created Quixote in 1997 after he sold the venerable Stags’ Leap Winery, was selling. Retiring, really.
An L.A. film crew was on site to shoot a promotional video of the property—the winery and adjacent home just up the hill. I, by luck and marriage, was there. Free to roam the estate for the better part of two days, I roamed. Then came the tasting. Not a few sips and spits. Bottles were opened. Bottles were drank. OK, call it a drinking. This all occurred on the petite winery’s patio, where an eclectic group of people had gathered. Marketing, PR and communications professionals by day; a street poet, folk art painter, East Coast rapper, Australian actress, and a few other Bohemians by night (or, in this case, by end of first bottle). Chatting with Doumani—about his stories as a vintner and about collaborating with an eccentric Austrian artist and architect to design the joint—only added to the surreal nature of the experience. 
Doumani and Friedensreich Hundertwasser, who worked for a decade to build the winery, paired together quite nicely—both unruly iconoclasts who relished poking the establishment. Doumani recalled the artist skinny dipping in the property’s pond and taking an ill-advised hike up the rocky mountainside in clogs with a couple of lady friends (he soon returned looking to borrow boots). Beyond the mischief, these characters connected for a noble pursuit. And the location and setting facilitated both of their visions. For Doumani, he surely got a kick out of constructing a Seussian structure in the heart of Napa Valley. For Hundertwasser, the landscape certainly invigorated his theme of organic forms in harmony with nature. The result of the project—Hundertwasser’s only building in the U.S.—is at once striking and serene. Golden dome, brightly colored (and cracked) tiles, warped floors, curved walls, and perfect imperfections infuse the air with magic and wonder. 
Doumani sold Quixote this week. For the sake of humanity, I pray the new owners honor the spirit (and spirits) of this Elysium, where gorgeous grapes are transformed into delicious nectar, where staid architecture surrenders to enchanting art.
"The straight line is a man-made danger. There are so many lines, but only one of them is deadly and that is the straight line drawn with a ruler. The straight line is completely alien to mankind, to life, to all creation."— Friedensreich Hundertwasser
ZoomInfo
Hundertwasser’s Quixote
In August 2013, I had the pleasure of visiting a wholly distinct structure and place all its own. Painted against the backdrop of the Stags Leap Palisades in Napa Valley, Quixote Winery produces some tasty Petite Sirah. Carl Doumani, who created Quixote in 1997 after he sold the venerable Stags’ Leap Winery, was selling. Retiring, really.
An L.A. film crew was on site to shoot a promotional video of the property—the winery and adjacent home just up the hill. I, by luck and marriage, was there. Free to roam the estate for the better part of two days, I roamed. Then came the tasting. Not a few sips and spits. Bottles were opened. Bottles were drank. OK, call it a drinking. This all occurred on the petite winery’s patio, where an eclectic group of people had gathered. Marketing, PR and communications professionals by day; a street poet, folk art painter, East Coast rapper, Australian actress, and a few other Bohemians by night (or, in this case, by end of first bottle). Chatting with Doumani—about his stories as a vintner and about collaborating with an eccentric Austrian artist and architect to design the joint—only added to the surreal nature of the experience. 
Doumani and Friedensreich Hundertwasser, who worked for a decade to build the winery, paired together quite nicely—both unruly iconoclasts who relished poking the establishment. Doumani recalled the artist skinny dipping in the property’s pond and taking an ill-advised hike up the rocky mountainside in clogs with a couple of lady friends (he soon returned looking to borrow boots). Beyond the mischief, these characters connected for a noble pursuit. And the location and setting facilitated both of their visions. For Doumani, he surely got a kick out of constructing a Seussian structure in the heart of Napa Valley. For Hundertwasser, the landscape certainly invigorated his theme of organic forms in harmony with nature. The result of the project—Hundertwasser’s only building in the U.S.—is at once striking and serene. Golden dome, brightly colored (and cracked) tiles, warped floors, curved walls, and perfect imperfections infuse the air with magic and wonder. 
Doumani sold Quixote this week. For the sake of humanity, I pray the new owners honor the spirit (and spirits) of this Elysium, where gorgeous grapes are transformed into delicious nectar, where staid architecture surrenders to enchanting art.
"The straight line is a man-made danger. There are so many lines, but only one of them is deadly and that is the straight line drawn with a ruler. The straight line is completely alien to mankind, to life, to all creation."— Friedensreich Hundertwasser
ZoomInfo
Hundertwasser’s Quixote
In August 2013, I had the pleasure of visiting a wholly distinct structure and place all its own. Painted against the backdrop of the Stags Leap Palisades in Napa Valley, Quixote Winery produces some tasty Petite Sirah. Carl Doumani, who created Quixote in 1997 after he sold the venerable Stags’ Leap Winery, was selling. Retiring, really.
An L.A. film crew was on site to shoot a promotional video of the property—the winery and adjacent home just up the hill. I, by luck and marriage, was there. Free to roam the estate for the better part of two days, I roamed. Then came the tasting. Not a few sips and spits. Bottles were opened. Bottles were drank. OK, call it a drinking. This all occurred on the petite winery’s patio, where an eclectic group of people had gathered. Marketing, PR and communications professionals by day; a street poet, folk art painter, East Coast rapper, Australian actress, and a few other Bohemians by night (or, in this case, by end of first bottle). Chatting with Doumani—about his stories as a vintner and about collaborating with an eccentric Austrian artist and architect to design the joint—only added to the surreal nature of the experience. 
Doumani and Friedensreich Hundertwasser, who worked for a decade to build the winery, paired together quite nicely—both unruly iconoclasts who relished poking the establishment. Doumani recalled the artist skinny dipping in the property’s pond and taking an ill-advised hike up the rocky mountainside in clogs with a couple of lady friends (he soon returned looking to borrow boots). Beyond the mischief, these characters connected for a noble pursuit. And the location and setting facilitated both of their visions. For Doumani, he surely got a kick out of constructing a Seussian structure in the heart of Napa Valley. For Hundertwasser, the landscape certainly invigorated his theme of organic forms in harmony with nature. The result of the project—Hundertwasser’s only building in the U.S.—is at once striking and serene. Golden dome, brightly colored (and cracked) tiles, warped floors, curved walls, and perfect imperfections infuse the air with magic and wonder. 
Doumani sold Quixote this week. For the sake of humanity, I pray the new owners honor the spirit (and spirits) of this Elysium, where gorgeous grapes are transformed into delicious nectar, where staid architecture surrenders to enchanting art.
"The straight line is a man-made danger. There are so many lines, but only one of them is deadly and that is the straight line drawn with a ruler. The straight line is completely alien to mankind, to life, to all creation."— Friedensreich Hundertwasser
ZoomInfo
Hundertwasser’s Quixote
In August 2013, I had the pleasure of visiting a wholly distinct structure and place all its own. Painted against the backdrop of the Stags Leap Palisades in Napa Valley, Quixote Winery produces some tasty Petite Sirah. Carl Doumani, who created Quixote in 1997 after he sold the venerable Stags’ Leap Winery, was selling. Retiring, really.
An L.A. film crew was on site to shoot a promotional video of the property—the winery and adjacent home just up the hill. I, by luck and marriage, was there. Free to roam the estate for the better part of two days, I roamed. Then came the tasting. Not a few sips and spits. Bottles were opened. Bottles were drank. OK, call it a drinking. This all occurred on the petite winery’s patio, where an eclectic group of people had gathered. Marketing, PR and communications professionals by day; a street poet, folk art painter, East Coast rapper, Australian actress, and a few other Bohemians by night (or, in this case, by end of first bottle). Chatting with Doumani—about his stories as a vintner and about collaborating with an eccentric Austrian artist and architect to design the joint—only added to the surreal nature of the experience. 
Doumani and Friedensreich Hundertwasser, who worked for a decade to build the winery, paired together quite nicely—both unruly iconoclasts who relished poking the establishment. Doumani recalled the artist skinny dipping in the property’s pond and taking an ill-advised hike up the rocky mountainside in clogs with a couple of lady friends (he soon returned looking to borrow boots). Beyond the mischief, these characters connected for a noble pursuit. And the location and setting facilitated both of their visions. For Doumani, he surely got a kick out of constructing a Seussian structure in the heart of Napa Valley. For Hundertwasser, the landscape certainly invigorated his theme of organic forms in harmony with nature. The result of the project—Hundertwasser’s only building in the U.S.—is at once striking and serene. Golden dome, brightly colored (and cracked) tiles, warped floors, curved walls, and perfect imperfections infuse the air with magic and wonder. 
Doumani sold Quixote this week. For the sake of humanity, I pray the new owners honor the spirit (and spirits) of this Elysium, where gorgeous grapes are transformed into delicious nectar, where staid architecture surrenders to enchanting art.
"The straight line is a man-made danger. There are so many lines, but only one of them is deadly and that is the straight line drawn with a ruler. The straight line is completely alien to mankind, to life, to all creation."— Friedensreich Hundertwasser
ZoomInfo
Hundertwasser’s Quixote
In August 2013, I had the pleasure of visiting a wholly distinct structure and place all its own. Painted against the backdrop of the Stags Leap Palisades in Napa Valley, Quixote Winery produces some tasty Petite Sirah. Carl Doumani, who created Quixote in 1997 after he sold the venerable Stags’ Leap Winery, was selling. Retiring, really.
An L.A. film crew was on site to shoot a promotional video of the property—the winery and adjacent home just up the hill. I, by luck and marriage, was there. Free to roam the estate for the better part of two days, I roamed. Then came the tasting. Not a few sips and spits. Bottles were opened. Bottles were drank. OK, call it a drinking. This all occurred on the petite winery’s patio, where an eclectic group of people had gathered. Marketing, PR and communications professionals by day; a street poet, folk art painter, East Coast rapper, Australian actress, and a few other Bohemians by night (or, in this case, by end of first bottle). Chatting with Doumani—about his stories as a vintner and about collaborating with an eccentric Austrian artist and architect to design the joint—only added to the surreal nature of the experience. 
Doumani and Friedensreich Hundertwasser, who worked for a decade to build the winery, paired together quite nicely—both unruly iconoclasts who relished poking the establishment. Doumani recalled the artist skinny dipping in the property’s pond and taking an ill-advised hike up the rocky mountainside in clogs with a couple of lady friends (he soon returned looking to borrow boots). Beyond the mischief, these characters connected for a noble pursuit. And the location and setting facilitated both of their visions. For Doumani, he surely got a kick out of constructing a Seussian structure in the heart of Napa Valley. For Hundertwasser, the landscape certainly invigorated his theme of organic forms in harmony with nature. The result of the project—Hundertwasser’s only building in the U.S.—is at once striking and serene. Golden dome, brightly colored (and cracked) tiles, warped floors, curved walls, and perfect imperfections infuse the air with magic and wonder. 
Doumani sold Quixote this week. For the sake of humanity, I pray the new owners honor the spirit (and spirits) of this Elysium, where gorgeous grapes are transformed into delicious nectar, where staid architecture surrenders to enchanting art.
"The straight line is a man-made danger. There are so many lines, but only one of them is deadly and that is the straight line drawn with a ruler. The straight line is completely alien to mankind, to life, to all creation."— Friedensreich Hundertwasser
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Hundertwasser’s Quixote

In August 2013, I had the pleasure of visiting a wholly distinct structure and place all its own. Painted against the backdrop of the Stags Leap Palisades in Napa Valley, Quixote Winery produces some tasty Petite Sirah. Carl Doumani, who created Quixote in 1997 after he sold the venerable Stags’ Leap Winery, was selling. Retiring, really.

An L.A. film crew was on site to shoot a promotional video of the property—the winery and adjacent home just up the hill. I, by luck and marriage, was there. Free to roam the estate for the better part of two days, I roamed. Then came the tasting. Not a few sips and spits. Bottles were opened. Bottles were drank. OK, call it a drinking. This all occurred on the petite winery’s patio, where an eclectic group of people had gathered. Marketing, PR and communications professionals by day; a street poet, folk art painter, East Coast rapper, Australian actress, and a few other Bohemians by night (or, in this case, by end of first bottle). Chatting with Doumani—about his stories as a vintner and about collaborating with an eccentric Austrian artist and architect to design the joint—only added to the surreal nature of the experience. 

Doumani and Friedensreich Hundertwasser, who worked for a decade to build the winery, paired together quite nicely—both unruly iconoclasts who relished poking the establishment. Doumani recalled the artist skinny dipping in the property’s pond and taking an ill-advised hike up the rocky mountainside in clogs with a couple of lady friends (he soon returned looking to borrow boots). Beyond the mischief, these characters connected for a noble pursuit. And the location and setting facilitated both of their visions. For Doumani, he surely got a kick out of constructing a Seussian structure in the heart of Napa Valley. For Hundertwasser, the landscape certainly invigorated his theme of organic forms in harmony with nature. The result of the project—Hundertwasser’s only building in the U.S.—is at once striking and serene. Golden dome, brightly colored (and cracked) tiles, warped floors, curved walls, and perfect imperfections infuse the air with magic and wonder. 

Doumani sold Quixote this week. For the sake of humanity, I pray the new owners honor the spirit (and spirits) of this Elysium, where gorgeous grapes are transformed into delicious nectar, where staid architecture surrenders to enchanting art.

"The straight line is a man-made danger. There are so many lines, but only one of them is deadly and that is the straight line drawn with a ruler. The straight line is completely alien to mankind, to life, to all creation."— Friedensreich Hundertwasser

#TelePolePoems in #ATL: Poncey-Highland
Check out these photos from my latest installment of the Telephone Pole Poetry Project. Though these #TelePolePoems were posted in the Poncey-Highland neighborhood of #ATL last weekend, go take a poetry walk on North Highland Avenue (between Freedom and Ponce) before they’re gone. East Atlanta Village, you’re next. Keep your eyes peeled this weekend.
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#TelePolePoems in #ATL: Poncey-Highland
Check out these photos from my latest installment of the Telephone Pole Poetry Project. Though these #TelePolePoems were posted in the Poncey-Highland neighborhood of #ATL last weekend, go take a poetry walk on North Highland Avenue (between Freedom and Ponce) before they’re gone. East Atlanta Village, you’re next. Keep your eyes peeled this weekend.
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#TelePolePoems in #ATL: Poncey-Highland
Check out these photos from my latest installment of the Telephone Pole Poetry Project. Though these #TelePolePoems were posted in the Poncey-Highland neighborhood of #ATL last weekend, go take a poetry walk on North Highland Avenue (between Freedom and Ponce) before they’re gone. East Atlanta Village, you’re next. Keep your eyes peeled this weekend.
ZoomInfo
#TelePolePoems in #ATL: Poncey-Highland
Check out these photos from my latest installment of the Telephone Pole Poetry Project. Though these #TelePolePoems were posted in the Poncey-Highland neighborhood of #ATL last weekend, go take a poetry walk on North Highland Avenue (between Freedom and Ponce) before they’re gone. East Atlanta Village, you’re next. Keep your eyes peeled this weekend.
ZoomInfo
#TelePolePoems in #ATL: Poncey-Highland
Check out these photos from my latest installment of the Telephone Pole Poetry Project. Though these #TelePolePoems were posted in the Poncey-Highland neighborhood of #ATL last weekend, go take a poetry walk on North Highland Avenue (between Freedom and Ponce) before they’re gone. East Atlanta Village, you’re next. Keep your eyes peeled this weekend.
ZoomInfo
#TelePolePoems in #ATL: Poncey-Highland
Check out these photos from my latest installment of the Telephone Pole Poetry Project. Though these #TelePolePoems were posted in the Poncey-Highland neighborhood of #ATL last weekend, go take a poetry walk on North Highland Avenue (between Freedom and Ponce) before they’re gone. East Atlanta Village, you’re next. Keep your eyes peeled this weekend.
ZoomInfo
#TelePolePoems in #ATL: Poncey-Highland
Check out these photos from my latest installment of the Telephone Pole Poetry Project. Though these #TelePolePoems were posted in the Poncey-Highland neighborhood of #ATL last weekend, go take a poetry walk on North Highland Avenue (between Freedom and Ponce) before they’re gone. East Atlanta Village, you’re next. Keep your eyes peeled this weekend.
ZoomInfo
#TelePolePoems in #ATL: Poncey-Highland
Check out these photos from my latest installment of the Telephone Pole Poetry Project. Though these #TelePolePoems were posted in the Poncey-Highland neighborhood of #ATL last weekend, go take a poetry walk on North Highland Avenue (between Freedom and Ponce) before they’re gone. East Atlanta Village, you’re next. Keep your eyes peeled this weekend.
ZoomInfo
#TelePolePoems in #ATL: Poncey-Highland
Check out these photos from my latest installment of the Telephone Pole Poetry Project. Though these #TelePolePoems were posted in the Poncey-Highland neighborhood of #ATL last weekend, go take a poetry walk on North Highland Avenue (between Freedom and Ponce) before they’re gone. East Atlanta Village, you’re next. Keep your eyes peeled this weekend.
ZoomInfo
#TelePolePoems in #ATL: Poncey-Highland
Check out these photos from my latest installment of the Telephone Pole Poetry Project. Though these #TelePolePoems were posted in the Poncey-Highland neighborhood of #ATL last weekend, go take a poetry walk on North Highland Avenue (between Freedom and Ponce) before they’re gone. East Atlanta Village, you’re next. Keep your eyes peeled this weekend.
ZoomInfo

#TelePolePoems in #ATL: Poncey-Highland

Check out these photos from my latest installment of the Telephone Pole Poetry Project. Though these #TelePolePoems were posted in the Poncey-Highland neighborhood of #ATL last weekend, go take a poetry walk on North Highland Avenue (between Freedom and Ponce) before they’re gone. East Atlanta Village, you’re next. Keep your eyes peeled this weekend.